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A PLACE TO DISCUSS THINGS THAT MATTER

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A PLACE TO DISCUSS THINGS THAT MATTER

Posted on November 15, 2018 at 1:50 PM Comments comments (0)


The topic of my second blog is based on the last photo in my Photo Gallery, a time span of eighty-two years from the first photo. Age has a way of putting things in prespective. Dottie and I were at the 2015 Manistee County Sport Fishing Association annual banquet. The date was May 4, 2017.

An excerpt from my book, Through the Eyes of a Fisherman---"Following dinner and a speaker, the program turned to announcing the award for “Unprecedented Commitment to the Manistee County Sport Fishing Association.” The award, given periodically to recognize outstanding service to MCSFA, was an honor to receive. No one, other than the nominating committee, knew the name of the person who was about to receive the award. Kevin, the master of ceremonies, read through the list of achievements of this year’s beneficiary. Catching large salmon, fishing internationally, catching peacock bass in Venezuela—wait a minute, that sounded too familiar. I looked around the room, all eyes were turned on me, as Kevin completed the list of achievements and then looked at me and said, “Congratulations, Denny, you are the recipient of the Unprecedented Commitment Award.” I was totally surprised and humbled as I gave a few extemporaneous remarks of how grateful and blessed I have been to be part of the MCSFA and to have met so many fine people over the years. On the way home from the banquet, I asked Dorothy, “How did Kevin get so much information on my fishing background?” She replied, “You gave it to Luanne. Don’t you remember when she called a couple of months ago and asked you to send information about your fishing experiences so Grace (my granddaughter) could write a class report?” Yes, I remembered and had to admit I had been had by my own clever daughter and “scheming” wife!"

Of course, I was proud to receive the award, but the point I want to empahsis is how quickly the years go by. Don't let a day go by without asking yourself, "am I doing my best with my God given abilities?" It doesn't matter the task, give it your best. It's not all about fame and forturne, its also about the lives you touch along the way. "Lord teach us to number our days, that we may gain a heart of widsom" Psalm 90:12. On a posiitive note, I have heard it said that every day of fishing adds a day to your life!


A PLACE TO DISCUSS THINGS THAT MATTER

Posted on November 9, 2018 at 1:50 PM Comments comments (0)

Welcome to my blog. From time to time I will post short stories behind the many photos in my Photo Gallery, I think you will find them interesting. Browse the photos and if you see one that interests you let me know and I will use that for a topic, I didn't number the photos as it takes up too much space on the pages, so just count from the top row, left to right to identify the photo you want to discuss. Also I welcome your comments on the topic of the day and any suggestions you may have to improve our time together.

To get started, I chose photo number 1 (first row, first photo) of me setting on a shock of straw with my granddad, Dennis S. Blue, in 1936. My parents, brother Tom, and I moved from Indianapolis, Indiana to my grandparents farm in 1938 where I spent my young adult life. An excerpt from Running the Good Race describes it best---

"With its possibilities to roam, play and grow up slowly, my parents couldn’t have picked a better place for Tom and me to spend our early years. There were few friends and activities outside the farm to influence us, apart from the radio, and there was little to do in the evening so we read, talked with our parents and grandparents and played games. Nature was our playground. Observing wild animals in the woods, catching frogs, snakes and insects, picking wild berries and mushrooms, we experienced something new each day. Tom and I liked playing in the red barn, hiding in the hayloft and climbing to the top of the silo on a metal ladder attached to the silo. On a clear day, we could see—as they say—forever. On each end of its roof, the barn had a copper lightning rod that also served as a weather vane and was shaped like a rooster. Tom and I would shoot at the rooster with our B-B guns—you could hear the ping when we hit the target. We had our bumps and bruises falling from beams in the barn and swinging from ropes suspended from the rafters. Fortunately, there were no serious injuries. It was while working and playing on this farm that I acquired my love for animals and the outdoors".

Those were great times and memories of a much simplier way of life. Not necessarily better with no running water or plumbing in the house, just simplier. Growing up on the farm is where I learned about hard work and responsibility. It was also during those early years that my faith began to take root and when God placed his hand on a young farm boy that guided him throughout his life. 



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